When You Can You Stop Paying Child Support in Oregon?

undefinedIf you’re contemplating a divorce and have children, child support will be a topic brought forth. For parents who will be asked to make these support payments, it’s important to understand Oregon’s laws for when these obligations can be terminated.

Throughout your divorce, you, your spouse, likely an attorney and potentially a judge will work together to come to fair agreements for the division of assets, as well as expected child and spousal support. During this process, a child support order will be created that will outline monetary payments and provisions for the child support. Most of these orders will state that payment obligations will be paid until the age of 18, unless the child enrolls in higher education. It should also be noted that if you child turns 18 during their final year of high-school, child support will typically continue until the following fall, so that it can be determined whether the child will be enrolling in higher education, which in turn would effect the support payment timeline.

Oregon law will continue to allow child support payments to continue past the age of 18 if the below qualifications are fulfilled:

  • The adult child is not married or in active duty, and is between the ages of 18-20 years old.
  • The adult child is attending school, college, university, Job Corps, GED courses or vocational training and is making appropriate academic progress according to the institution’s standards.
  • There must be a current child support order providing for the support, and the judgment must not be fully satisfied.
  • The adult child cannot be emancipated from his or her parents.

Every family law case is fact-dependent to some degree and will have variances, which his why it’s important to have an experienced attorney behind you to help explain the intricacies of law and any nuances that could come into play. If you’re going through a divorce and have children, the attorneys at Landerholm will help not only simplify the child support process, but will advocate for both you and your children’s rights.

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